I abhorred the face of man. Oh, not abhorred! They were my brethren, my fellow beings, and I felt attracted even to the most repulsive among them, as to creatures of an angelic nature and celestial mechanism.

Category: Religion | Type: Discussion | Title: Frankenstein (in Context) | Author: Mary Shelley | Ch: Chapter 22

Humbled, Frankenstein is prepared to view humanity as "brethren, fellow beings," though he must catch himself for he has just said that "I abhorred the face of man," and the statement "I felt attracted even to the most repulsive" is not without its paradox. Still, he is learning a generalized benevolence, but it's awkward for him, as captured in the strange phrasing, "creatures of an angelic nature and celestial mechanism," by which he means the soul. But this qualification excludes the monster, who, as mentioned earlier, apparently lacks a soul and thus no connection with the divine. 

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